DREaM 5 speaker insight: Carla Basili

Carla Basili

In the second of our DREaM Conference preview posts, Dr Carla Basili describes the perspectives that she will bring to the panel discussion …and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers.
 
Dr Carla Basili is Senior Researcher at the Italian National Research Council and Associate Professor on Methodologies of Scientific Information at Sapienza University in Rome.
 
Note: In the event Carla Basili was unable to attend the DREaM conference on 9th July 2012. John Dolan kindly took her place on the panel.

How have you been involved in the DREaM project to date?

Participation in the panel session at the DREaM conference on 9th July will be my first face-to-face involvement in the project.

Why are you participating at the conference?

I’m pleased to be participating at the conference because the themes of the DREaM project are close to my research interests. In 2003 I launched a network of researchers in Information Literacy (EnIL, the European network on Information Literacy). On 9th July I can report about my experience of this network, and a framework of variables for the qualitative analysis and comparison of European information literacy policies. I’ll be happy to discuss these themes with delegates one-to-one during the breaks and networking sessions, as well as formally during the panel session.

The title of the afternoon panel session at the conference is “…and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers”. Why is it important that the UK network of LIS researchers is sustained, and what do you anticipate we will be discussed in the panel session?

Firstly, the DREaM project is a timely attempt to answer to the question: how to justify the funding of research in the LIS domain? This question, indeed, is part of a more general concern as to how research funding in the Humanities can be justified in terms of impact.

Both these connected questions are of great relevance, particularly in the European context. What’s interesting and new about the work of the DREaM project is that while a number of initiatives have been already undertaken for the Arts and Humanities sector in general, the focus here is on one disciplinary area in particular: library and information science.

Secondly, and with specific reference to the theme of the panel discussion, I’m looking forward to discussing concrete steps that will:

  • formalise and manage the DREaM network and
  • raise the familiarity among LIS researchers with innovative research methods and interdisciplinary research

…together with the potential benefits of collaborating in a network.

Dr Carla Basili will be participating in a panel discussion entitled: …and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers at the DREaM Conference at the British Library on Monday 9th July. For full details about the conference programme and to book a place, please see the conference web page.

DREaM 5 speaker insight: Dr Louise Cooke

Louise Cooke

Dr Louise Cooke

As the DREaM Conference at the British Library on 9th July fast approaches, we bring you the first in our series of preview posts from our speakers and panelists. In this post, Dr Louise Cooke describes her involvement with the DREaM project as a whole and introduces her invited paper: Facets of DREaM: An analysis of network development to support UK LIS research and researchers.

Dr Louise Cooke is a Senior Lecturer at Loughborough University, where she teaches on the MSc Information and Knowledge Management programme.

Dr Cooke gave an introduction to social network analysis at the second DREaM event.
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Participate in LIS DREaM 4 Online

As we prepare to get the third DREaM workshop under way, you may be regretting that you can’t join us to hear more about horizon scanning, data mining, research techniques from psychology and impact snakes and ladders.

If you are not able to join the cadre today, there are still ways you can follow the event online and participate in both the discussions and the workshop task…
 

Follow LIS DREaM 4 Live

 
You can follow a live commentary of this session on Twitter by following @LIS_DREaM. Please join in with the discussion by using the event hash tag #lis_dream4.

If you are not a Twitter user, you can follow the event live via CoverItLive. You can contribute your own observations and questions via CoverItLive without the need for a login or account.

You will find all the materials you need to follow along on the individual session pages, which will be linked from the main programme page.

Our event amplifier, Kirsty Pitkin, will be on hand to support remote participants throughout the event. If you would like her to ask any of the speakers a question or your behalf, please tweet it to @LIS_DREaM or post it in the CoverItLive session and she will relay it for you and report back with the answer.
 

Workshop Task

 
Today’s workshop task will be led by Professor Hazel Hall and will consist of two tasks. The workshop task timetable is available on Slideshare.

If you are participating remotely, you will need to follow the #lis_dream4 or CoverItLive session at 10:30 for instructions from Hazel, then contribute your answers to the first part of the task using this shared Google document. There is no login required to take part and your contributions will be fed back to the group so we can share your insights and add these to the permanent record of the event.

You can contribute to the first part of the workshop task at any time during the workshop up until 15:30. If you miss the coverage of Hazel’s introduction to the first part of the task at 10:30, just let us know via Twitter or CoverItLive and Kirsty will explain what you need to do.

The second part of the task will take place during Hazel’s presentation.
 

DREaM Community

 
If you would like to comment on any of the topics raised today in more detail, please join the discussion in the DREaM online community and add a blog post. The post event materials, including recordings of each presentation, slides, photos and workshop task outputs, will all be made available via the DREaM community site shortly after the event.

DREaM event 4 speaker insight: Hazel Hall

Professor Hazel Hall

Our final preview interview ahead of DREaM event 4 is with Professor Hazel Hall from the LIS Research Coalition. She will be leading a session on research impact at the workshop entitled: Impact snakes and ladders.

In this interview, Hall discusses the importance of impact and describes how her session will help participants to consider the impact of their research in the planning stages.

 
 

What is the theme of your session?

The theme of the session is research impact. We’ll be considering how researchers can ensure that their research projects are designed with reference to their potential impact on practice, and what makes the practitioner audience receptive to using the output of library and information science research in their practice of information services delivery.

Have you used your knowledge of strategies to increase research impact this in your own research work?

Yes, when we plan research projects in my research centre at Edinburgh Napier University we take care to consider means of ensuring that the work we complete does not simply end up sitting unnoticed in a formal project report or journal article. A recent example is the second part of our Research in Librarianship Impact Evaluation Study (RiLIES) project. Here, for example, we have been involving practitioners in the project from the outset (currently we have a practitioner poll open, which we are keen for LIS practitioners to complete), and the primary role of one member of the project team is to develop the strategy for embedding the research output in the LIS practitioner community.

How do you think the topic of impact is relevant to LIS researchers?

The theme of impact is relevant to all research, particularly at a time when value for money in public spending is paramount, and the forthcoming UK assessment of academic research (REF2014) requires the submission of impact evidence for research by universities. In short, it’s a question on return on investment.

Where can people will find more information?

Our report from the first part of the RiLIES project Enhancing the impact of LIS Research Projects identifies factors that increase/hinder the impact of research findings on those who deliver library and information services. The report also includes an extensive reference list of material related to the theme of research impact.

Professor Hazel Hall will be presenting a session titled: Impact snakes and ladders: workshop exercise on links between research and its impact on practice at the fourth DREaM workshop at the Edinburgh Napier University on Wednesday 25th April. She will also be concluding the workshop task. For full details about the workshop, please see the workshop programme.

DREaM event 4 speaker insight: Phil Turner

The third of our preview interviews ahead of DREaM event 4 is with Dr Phil Turner from Edinburgh Napier University. He will be covering techniques from psychology, focussing specifically on repertory grids.
 

Which research technique will you be discussing with the workshop participants in your presentation?

The use of repertory grids (“rep grids”) to elicit experiences. Rep grids are a well established interviewing technique based on personal construct theory. Rep grids, in conjunction with specialist software, are a useful means of visualising an individual’s experience.

Have you used this in your own research?

Yes, and the talk will include material from a recent journal publication.

How do you think this might be useful as a method in LIS research?

It already has been used successfully in the library/information science domain.

Where can people will find more information?

You want me to tell library people where to find more information – really? (Note from workshop organisers: At the end of Dr Turner’s PowerPoint slides he provides a reference list. This will be made available from Wednesday 25th April.)

Dr Phil Turner will be presenting a session introducing techniques from psychology at the fourth DREaM workshop at the Edinburgh Napier University on Wednesday 25th April. For full details about the workshop, please see the workshop programme.

DREaM event 4 speaker insight: Kevin Swingler

Kevin Swingler


 

The second in our series of preview interviews ahead of DREaM event 4 is with Kevin Swingler from Stirling University. In this interview, he introduces us to his topic of data mining and reflects how this might be applied to LIS research.
 
 
 

Which research method will you be discussing with the workshop participants in your presentation?

I will be discussing data mining techniques. These are methods for using data to ‘teach’ a computer to perform a task. Data mining is less concerned with understanding the data or the process that produced it than most techniques. In this sense it is task oriented – we use the data to predict future events or classify situations as being similar to those seen in the past.

How have you used this in your own research?

My own research includes devising new data mining techniques and using existing ones – mostly for commercial applications such as predicting consumer behaviour, spotting fraud in banking or insurance, and predicting medical outcomes.

How do you think this might be useful as a method in LIS research?

An example of where data mining might be useful in LIS is automatic sentiment classification in social media. This is the process of training a computer to tell whether the attitude in a social media message is positive or negative. It can also be used to find posts on certain topics where simple keyword lists are not enough.

Where can people will find more information?

I have a series of lecture slides on data mining from my course at Stirling University. You can see them here.

A good book is Data Mining: Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques by I.H. Witten and E. Frank

Kevin Swingler will be presenting a session introducing data mining at the fourth DREaM workshop at the Edinburgh Napier University on Wednesday 25th April. For full details about the workshop, please see the workshop programme.

DREaM 4 speaker insight: Dr Harry J Woodroof

The fourth LIS DREaM event is just around the corner already and we’re getting ready to welcome the cadre back to Edinburgh Napier’s Craighouse campus for what promises to be a fascinating series of presentations, ranging from horizon scanning and data mining to impact and techniques from psychology.

Once again we will be interviewing our expert speakers to get an insight into their sessions ahead of the workshop. The first of these interviews is with Dr Harry J Woodroof from the Defence Science & Technology Laboratory, who previews his session on horizon scanning for us now…

What will you be discussing with the workshop participants in your presentation?

I will explain the reasons that organisations – such as Government – need to carry out horizon scanning. The principal one is to inform today’s decision-makers about both the risks and the opportunities of the future, and their implications. I shall describe what horizon scanning is, and why, compared to some other techniques, it can be particularly helpful to policy-makers and others who need to understand and manage the uncertainties that characterise the future. I shall compare two of the horizon scanning processes in use within UK Government: those in the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) and in the Foresight Horizon Scanning Centre within the Government Office for Science.

How have you used this in your own research work?

I will briefly describe two examples of how horizon scanning work that I was involved in has been used in UK Government: the National Security Strategy update of 2009 and the analysis phase of the Comprehensive Spending Review of 2007.

How do you think this topic might be relevant to LIS researchers?

Horizon scanning can be part of the overall “knowledge mix” of a research-focussed organisation.

Where can people will find more information?

Details of the work of the Foresight Horizon Scanning Centre are their website. Its published scan – the Sigma Scan – is at www.sigmascan.org.

You can also follow this link is to a paper published by two of my colleagues which describes some aspects of Dstl’s horizon scanning work.

Dr Harry J Woodroof will be presenting a session introducing horizon scanning at the fourth DREaM workshop at the Edinburgh Napier University on Wednesday 25th April. For full details about the workshop, please see the workshop programme.

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