Media releases issued by the Coalition

Below are listed the media releases issued by the LIS Research Coalition in reverse chronological order. Each link leads to the full text of a release.


Media release 31st May 2012

Ben Goldacre to present Practitioner Researcher Excellence Award to clinical librarian team at DREaM conference (31st May 2012)

A team of 15 clinical librarians has won the Practitioner Researcher Excellence Award. Best selling-author, broadcaster, academic and full-time medic, Dr Ben Goldacre will present the award to the North West Clinical Librarian Systematic Review and Evaluation Group on Monday 9th July 2012 at the Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) conference at the British Library.

The Library and Information Science (LIS) Research Coalition has offered the £500 award to mark the achievement of an individual or team that has made a substantial contribution to LIS research since its establishment in 2009.

The nomination for the North West Clinical Librarian Systematic Review and Evaluation Group was one of a number of high quality nominations demonstrating the range and breadth of practitioner research undertaken by librarians across the UK.

Chair of the judging panel, Professor Hazel Hall said “The winners of this award have shown how a strong cooperative team approach to LIS research can have a wide impact on the service delivery of other practitioners, library users and, in this case, patient care”.

The research of the clinical librarians focused on two linked projects. In the first the team, mentored by Dr Alison Brettle of Salford University, conducted a rigorous systematic review to develop guidelines for the evaluation of the effectiveness and impact of clinical librarian services. Following completion and publication of the review, they then undertook a follow-up project to put their guidelines into practice and carried out an evaluation of clinical librarian services throughout the North West region.

The judging panel commended this work for demonstrating the link between practitioner research and services delivery beyond the core community, and the key role of library and information services in healthcare provision. The panel also acknowledged the engagement of practitioners in all aspects of the research process, as well as an on-going commitment to research capacity building.

The winning team provides a clear example of how organisational practice can be improved through collaborative research initiated by practising librarians.

There are still places available for the DREaM conference with travel bursaries available for PhD student, new professional and international delegates. Expert speakers and panelists participating at the DREaM conference include Jo Alcock, Dr Carla Basili, Dr Louise Cooke, Professor Hazel Hall, Annie Mauger, Professor Charles Oppenheim and Professor Carol Tenopir. Dr Ben Goldacre will also deliver the closing keynote paper.

Notes:

1. Dr Ben Goldacre

Bad Science the book (4th Estate) has sold over half a million copies worldwide, reached number one in the paperback non-fiction charts, and is being published in 25 countries. Ben has won several awards, including the Royal Statistical Society’s first Award For Statistical Excellence in Journalism, the Faculty of Public Health DARE Prize Lecture, an honorary doctorate from Heriot-Watt University, “Best Freelancer” at the Medical Journalists Awards 2006, the Healthwatch Award in 2006, “Best Feature” at the British Science Writers Awards twice, and he was shortlisted in the Samuel Johnson and Royal Society literary prizes 2009.

In addition to writing Ben has appeared on television and radio and speaks regularly at conferences and events. He was trained in Medicine at Oxford and London, and now works a full-time doctor.

He has appeared on The Today Programme, Newsnight, Start the Week, The Now Show, Loose Ends, PM, Quote Unquote, Watchdog, Nightwaves, and many more. He made The Rise of the Lifestyle Nutritionists, and the two part documentary The Placebo Effect for BBC Radio 4, and is in the process of making a three part documentary series for the BBC World Service. He has given about 150 lectures in various schools and universities over the past couple of years.

2. DREaM project

The DREaM project is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). It is based at Edinburgh Napier University and supported by the LIS Research Coalition. Follow the DREaM project on Twitter at @LIS_DREaM.

3. The Library and Information Science Research Coalition

The The Library and Information Science Research Coalition was established in March 2009 with the remit of facilitating a co-ordinated and strategic approach to Library and Information Science (LIS) research across the UK. To find out more visit http://lisresearch.org.

4. Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) supports world-class research that furthers our understanding of human culture and creativity. Each year the AHRC provides approximately £112 million from the Government to support research and postgraduate study in the arts and humanities, from languages and law, archaeology and English literature to design and creative and performing arts. In any one year, the AHRC makes approximately 700 research awards and around 1,350 postgraduate awards. Awards are made after a rigorous peer review process, to ensure that only applications of the highest quality are funded. The quality and range of research supported by this investment of public funds not only provides social and cultural benefits but also contributes to the economic success of the UK.


Media release 30th January 2012

“Bad Science” author confirmed keynote speaker at library and information science researchers’ conference (30th January 2012)

Dr Ben Goldacre (copyright Rhys Stacker 2009)

Dr Ben Goldacre (copyright Rhys Stacker 2009)

Dr Ben Goldacre – author, broadcaster, medical doctor and academic – has been confirmed as a keynote speaker at a UK conference for librarians and information scientists this summer. Dr Ben Goldacre has written the weekly Bad Science column in the Guardian since 2003. He specialises in unpicking scientific claims made by government reports, pharmaceutical corporations, journalists and PR companies. Dr Ben Goldacre’s presentation on research, evidence bases, decision making and policy will conclude a day devoted to considering the role of research in supporting library and information services provision.

He will be contributing to the programme of conferences and workshops that comprise the Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) project. DREaM is led by Professor Hall of Edinburgh Napier University, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, and supported by the Library and Information Science Research Coalition. The conference takes place at the British Library Conference Centre on Monday July 9th 2012.

Dr Goldacre will also make a presentation to the winner of the Library and Information Science Practitioner Researcher Excellence Award at the conference. The award is for either an individual librarian or information scientist, or a team that has made a substantial contribution to LIS research since 2009. The award winner will receive a £500 prize and a plaque.

Conference registrations will open in the spring. To pre-register please email Professor Hazel Hall hazel.hall@lisresearch.org.

Nominations for the Library and Information Science Practitioner Researcher Excellence Award should take the form of a 500-word statement that demonstrates the research excellence of the candidate, or candidate team, and refers to evidence of their research output e.g. published articles, blogs, conference papers, presentations on SlideShare. The deadline for nominations is 30th April 2012. Nominations should be sent to hazel.hall@lisresearch.org. The judging panel will be formed by the LIS Research Coalition Board of Directors.

Notes:

1. Dr Ben Goldacre

Bad Science the book (4th Estate) has sold over half a million copies worldwide, reached number one in the paperback non-fiction charts, and is being published in 25 countries. Ben has won several awards, including the Royal Statistical Society’s first Award For Statistical Excellence in Journalism, the Faculty of Public Health DARE Prize Lecture, an honorary doctorate from Heriot-Watt University, “Best Freelancer” at the Medical Journalists Awards 2006, the Healthwatch Award in 2006, “Best Feature” at the British Science Writers Awards twice, and he was shortlisted in the Samuel Johnson and Royal Society literary prizes 2009.

In addition to writing Ben has appeared on television and radio and speaks regularly at conferences and events. He was trained in Medicine at Oxford and London, and now works a full-time doctor.

He has appeared on The Today Programme, Newsnight, Start the Week, The Now Show, Loose Ends, PM, Quote Unquote, Watchdog, Nightwaves, and many more. He made The Rise of the Lifestyle Nutritionists, and the two part documentary The Placebo Effect for BBC Radio 4, and is in the process of making a three part documentary series for the BBC World Service. He has given about 150 lectures in various schools and universities over the past couple of years.

2. DREaM project

The DREaM project is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). It is based at Edinburgh Napier University and supported by the LIS Research Coalition. Follow the DREaM project on Twitter at @LIS_DREaM.

3. The Library and Information Science Research Coalition

The The Library and Information Science Research Coalition was established in March 2009 with the remit of facilitating a co-ordinated and strategic approach to Library and Information Science (LIS) research across the UK. To find out more visit http://lisresearch.org.

4. Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) supports world-class research that furthers our understanding of human culture and creativity. Each year the AHRC provides approximately £112 million from the Government to support research and postgraduate study in the arts and humanities, from languages and law, archaeology and English literature to design and creative and performing arts. In any one year, the AHRC makes approximately 700 research awards and around 1,350 postgraduate awards. Awards are made after a rigorous peer review process, to ensure that only applications of the highest quality are funded. The quality and range of research supported by this investment of public funds not only provides social and cultural benefits but also contributes to the economic success of the UK.


Media release 19th July 2011

LIS Research Coalition launches Library and Information Science Practitioner Researcher Excellence Award (19th July 2011)

The Library and Information Science Research Coalition has announced a Library and Information Science (LIS) Practitioner Researcher Excellence Award for LIS professionals based in the UK and Republic of Ireland.

The award will be presented in July 2012 to either (a) an individual librarian or information scientist, or (b) a team that has made a substantial contribution to LIS research since 2009. The award winner will receive £500 and a plaque.

The award was announced at the Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) launch conference held at the British Library on Tuesday 19th July 2011. The presentation to the winner will be made next year on Monday 9th July 2012 at the British Library at the last of the five DREaM project events.

Nominations should take the form of a 500-word statement that demonstrates the research excellence of the candidate (or candidate team) and refers to evidence of their research output (e.g. published articles, blogs, conference papers, presentations on SlideShare).

The deadline for nominations is 30th April 2012. Nominations should be sent to hazel.hall@lisresearch.org . Members of the LIS Research Coalition Board of Directors will form the judging panel for the award.

Notes

  1. In this context “practitioner researcher” means anyone who works delivering a library or information service. Academics and consultants are not eligible for nomination.
  2. Self-nomination is not permitted.
  3. See also the main DREaM project web page.

Media release 31st May 2011

Tales of the unexpected – diverse range of speakers booked for library research conference (31st May 2011)

A fascinating range of speakers have been booked for the first Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) conference. Speakers include a Professor of Stem Cell Biology, an installation artist and a Lecturer in Behavioural Science.

DREaM is a UK-wide network of Library and Information Science (LIS) researchers. It aims to improve library and information services by helping spread expertise and providing opportunities for knowledge exchange. This launch conference will be followed by a series of workshops to be held in Edinburgh and London in 2011/12.

Taking “out of the comfort zone” as its main theme, the conference schedule includes sessions that cover the DREaM project; the trajectory of LIS research; research collaborations across disciplines; research approaches, methods and techniques; research dissemination, including working with the media; public engagement with research; and the building of a research network for LIS researchers in the UK.

The programme is designed to appeal to everyone with an interest in LIS research and based in the UK, including PhD students, established practitioners and academics, as well as the wider LIS research community, such as publishers.

The conference format includes keynote presentations and break-out sessions, with further opportunities for delegates to participate actively in the discussions on the day. It takes place on Tuesday 19 July at the British Library Conference Centre in London. There are five free sponsored places available to new professionals and twenty discounted places for PhD students.

Find out more about the conference including the full programme and register your place.


Media release 17th February 2011

Contribute to librarianship research evaluation study (17th February 2011)

Librarians and library and information science researchers have the opportunity to contribute to the Research in Librarianship – Impact Evaluation Study (RiLIES). The study explores the extent to which funded librarianship research projects influence library practice in the UK.

The first opportunity to contribute is by filling in a short poll by Sunday 6th March. The poll will take no more than five minutes to complete. It will be used to identify research projects that could be used for case studies and help understand the needs of librarians when using research to improve library and information services.

Dr Hazel Hall is leading the project. She said:

“The RiLIES research project is an exciting new development which will help us understand the impact of research projects on the day-to-day work carried out by library and information professionals. RiLIES will shine a light on the value of research in improving library and information services.”

Further information about RiLIES is available from the LIS Research Coalition web site and from the project’s Twitter feed.

Dr Hazel Hall is Director of the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University and Executive Secretary of the Library and Information Science Research Coalition. RiLIES will run from February to July 2011.


Media release 18th November 2010

Library and information science research project awarded £45,000 grant (18th November 2010)

UK-wide network of LIS researchers to be created

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) has awarded a £45,000 grant to develop a formal UK-wide network of Library and Information Science (LIS) researchers. The network will spread expertise through a connected community across all LIS sectors. It will provide high quality training events and opportunities for knowledge exchange. The ultimate aim is to improve library and information services.

The grant has been awarded to Dr Hazel Hall, Director of the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University and Executive Secretary of the Library and Information Science Research Coalition. It has been awarded for a project called Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM). The project will last for twenty months from January 2011 until August 2012.

In 2011 and 2012 five DREaM conferences and workshops will take place in Edinburgh and London. These will involve research experts from a range of backgrounds as speakers and session facilitators. Print publications and case studies will be made available so that the wider UK LIS research community benefits.

The aims of the DREaM project are to:

  • Build capacity and capability in the development and implementation of innovative methods and techniques in undertaking LIS research
  • Raise the quality and standards of research training and practice in LIS
  • Establish a foundation for long-term research collaborations across LIS and related sectors
  • Enhance the value and impact of LIS research output with particular reference to policy development
  • Inform future LIS research agendas for investment
  • Improve library and information services provision

About the AHRC

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) supports world-class research that furthers our understanding of human culture and creativity. Each year the AHRC provides approximately £112 million from the Government to support research and postgraduate study in the arts and humanities, from languages and law, archaeology and English literature to design and creative and performing arts. In any one year, the AHRC makes approximately 700 research awards and around 1,350 postgraduate awards. Awards are made after a rigorous peer review process, to ensure that only applications of the highest quality are funded. The quality and range of research supported by this investment of public funds not only provides social and cultural benefits but also contributes to the economic success of the UK: http://www.ahrc.ac.uk


Media release 5th July 2010

One minute madness and a whole day of sense (5th July 2010)

First Library and Information Science Research Coalition conference is a resounding success

A “one minute madness” session proved to be one of the highlights of the day at the Library and Information Science (LIS) Research Coalition conference held in London on 28 June.

Twenty-two brave delegates took the stage for 60 seconds each in response to the question “Evidence, value and impact: what’s on your mind?” They spoke about their on-going research, made calls for project participants, and promoted their companies’ research products and services. Banjo music, sheets of paper and an empty plastic bottle featured as props in a session that demonstrated the variety of interests, and areas of expertise, in the UK LIS research community.

Equally popular at the conference was the inspirational opening keynote paper presented by Professor Andrew Dillon of the University of Texas. Dillon emphasised the need to separate two types of research:

  • Looking at the technology of organising and presenting
  • Studying the ways that humans deal with information so that technology may be shaped to serve people better

Professor Charles Oppenheim’s closing keynote paper was developed as the conference unfolded. Oppenheim was assisted in developing his paper by six PhD students, who pulled together key messages from the plenary and breakout sessions. Oppenheim highlighted future priority areas for both the LIS Research Coalition, and the LIS research community at large, concluding that “evidence, value and impact should be on the LIS research agenda”.

Go to the conference web page for more information, including a summary of Dillon’s keynote speech, a summary of Oppenheim’s keynote speech, an explanation of “one minute madness” and video interviews with delegates on the day.


Media release 10th May 2010

Six Library and Information Science PhD students win sponsored places at the LIS Research Coalition conference (10th May 2010)

The six students will be playing an active role at the conference by reporting on the presentations, discussions and outcomes. In their winning applications the successful students demonstrated a keen interest in Library and Information Science (LIS) research, and evidence of skills that will help them report on the conference.

Each student wins a sponsored place at the conference thanks to the generosity of three recruitment firms: Glen Recruitment, Sue Hill Recruitment, and TFPL. The students will attend the conference on Monday 28th June at the British Library Conference Centre in London.

Three students from the Department of Information Science at City University – Charlie Inskip, Charlie Mayor and Liz Poirier – are joined by Liz Brewster of the Department of Information Studies at Sheffield University, Hannah Spring of the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences at York St John University, and Hui-Yun Sung of Loughborough University as award winners at this year’s Library and Information Science Research Coalition conference.

The students will also have an opportunity at the event to present their research. They may choose to do this along with other delegates in the conference’s one minute madness session. One minute madness is a hard-hitting, rapid-fire, 60-second opportunity way of presenting ideas in an informal and fun way. At this session and in informal discussions the delegates will be able to take advantage of learning from the students of current research projects spanning key issues in public, health and music librarianship, information behaviour and use, and the organisation of knowledge.

The broad conference programme considers perspectives of the LIS research landscape. It will tackle issues relating to identifying LIS research opportunities; translating research outcomes into practice; growing research capacity amongst LIS professionals; and developing the future UK LIS research agenda.

The programme will appeal to all LIS research stakeholders from funders of LIS-related research activity through to those who publish LIS research output, as well as practitioner researchers and academics. With first-hand access to expert speakers and peers on the day, delegates will develop their knowledge of the LIS research landscape, including the work of the LIS Research Coalition, while also increasing their awareness of:

  • The diversity of LIS research opportunities
  • Research funding sources
  • Potential research collaborators
  • Means of increasing the relevance of their research efforts
  • Avenues for publication of their research output
  • Research development opportunities for individuals and groups
  • Techniques for integrating research activities into everyday work practice

The opening keynote speaker, Professor Andrew Dillon of the University of Texas – an LIS researcher of international repute – will speak on international perspectives of UK LIS research. The closing keynote speaker, Loughborough University’s Professor Charles Oppenheim – also an LIS researcher of international standing – will discuss how an examination of the evidence, value and impact of current LIS research can inform the future LIS research agenda.

Afternoon break-out sessions will be led by a number of experts with research experience in public, academic, special and corporate libraries; the health service; business; publishing; consulting; training; charities and higher education.

The conference venue is the British Library’s state of the art Conference Centre. Located in central London, the British Library Conference Centre is within easy walking distance of three mainline railway stations – St Pancras (Eurostar terminal), Euston and King’s Cross – and six tube lines, and is thus at the heart of the UK and European transportation network.

The conference fee is £100 inclusive of VAT (£85.10 + £14.90 VAT).


Media release 30th March 2010

Library and Information Science Research Coalition launches first national conference (30th March 2010)

The one-day conference, Evidence, Value and Impact: the LIS Research Landscape in 2010, will take place on 28 June at the British Library Conference Centre.

It will consider perspectives on the Library and Information Science (LIS) research landscape. It will tackle issues relating to identifying LIS research opportunities; translating research outcomes into practice; growing research capacity amongst LIS professionals; and developing the future UK LIS research agenda.

The programme will appeal to all LIS research stakeholders from funders of LIS-related research activity through to those who publish LIS research output, as well as practitioner researchers and academics. With first-hand access to expert speakers and peers on the day, delegates will develop their knowledge of the LIS research landscape, including the work of the LIS Research Coalition, while also increasing their awareness of:

  • The diversity of LIS research opportunities
  • Research funding sources
  • Potential research collaborators
  • Means of increasing the relevance of their research efforts
  • Avenues for publication of their research output
  • Research development opportunities for individuals and groups
  • Techniques for integrating research activities into everyday work practice

The conference includes keynote presentations and break-out sessions, with further opportunities for delegates to participate actively in the discussions on the day, including a “one minute madness” session.

The opening keynote speaker, Professor Andrew Dillon of the University of Texas – an LIS researcher of international repute – will speak on international perspectives of UK LIS research. The closing keynote speaker, Loughborough University’s Professor Charles Oppenheim – also an LIS researcher of international standing – will discuss how an examination of the evidence, value and impact of current LIS research can inform the future LIS research agenda.

Afternoon break-out sessions will be led by a number of experts with research experience in public, academic, special and corporate libraries; the health service; business; publishing; consulting; training; charities and higher education.

Delegates will have their chance to take the stage in the conference’s “one minute madness” session immediately before the lunch break. One minute madness is a hard-hitting, rapid-fire, 60-second opportunity way of presenting ideas in an informal and fun way. The format allows speakers to put across a core idea much more successfully than is often the case for formal conference papers. Delegates who wish to participate in the one minute madness session sign up when they register for the conference.

The conference venue is the British Library’s state of the art Conference Centre. Located in central London, the British Library Conference Centre is within easy walking distance of three mainline railway stations – St Pancras (Eurostar terminal), Euston and King’s Cross – and six tube lines, and is thus at the heart of the UK and European transportation network.

The conference fee is £100 inclusive of VAT (£85.10 + £14.90 VAT). Six sponsored places for PhD students are available thanks to the generosity of three LIS recruitment firms: Glen Recruitment, Sue Hill Recruitment, and TFPL.


Media release 10th December 2009

Dr Hazel Hall awarded IWR Information Professional of the Year (10th December 2009)

Dr Hazel Hall, Executive Secretary of the Library and Information Science Research Coalition, has been awarded Information Professional of the Year. The Award was presented to Hazel for her outstanding contribution to the profession in the last 12 months.

Dr Hall was delighted to receive the award, “Winning the Information Professional of the Year award comes at the end of an extraordinary 12 months. I am delighted that my work in my two roles as Director of the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University, and in implementing the Library and Information Science Research Coalition, has been recognised in such a way.”

“All those with whom I have collaborated throughout the year are due a share of this recognition,” said Dr Hall, “particularly my international colleagues in Scandinavia, Canada and the US, and the information and knowledge management practitioner community in the UK, whose work inspires my research and teaching.”

Dr Hall is Director of the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University, and Executive Secretary of the Library and Information Science Research Coalition. She is an internationally recognised information professional, best known for her research and teaching of information and knowledge management. Dr Hall also holds a reputation for her active involvement with information and knowledge management practitioners through work with professional bodies, as well as time spent in industry.

The LIS Research Coalition was founded in March 2009 by the British Library, the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), the Museums Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) and the Research Information Network (RIN).

The award is organised by IWR magazine and Online Information Conference organisers, Incisive Media and sponsored by the American Psychological Association. Nominations are judged by a panel of previous Information Professional of the Year award winners including; Roddy McLeod, Karen Blakeman, Neil Infield, Euan Semple, Brian Kelly, Tony Hirst and Natalie Ceeney.


Media release 7th September 2009

Newly-formed UK Library and Information Science Research Coalition makes its first appointment (7th September 2009)

Dr Hazel Hall has been appointed to provide strategic leadership of the newly-established Library and Information Science Research Coalition.

The remit of the Coalition is to facilitate a co-ordinated and strategic approach to Library and Information Science (LIS) Research across the UK. It was founded in March this year by the British Library (BL), the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), the Museums Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) and the Research Information Network (RIN). Dr Hall is the Coalition’s first appointment.

The Coalition aims to bring together information about LIS research opportunities and results; encourage dialogue between research funders; promote LIS practitioner research and the translation of research outcomes into practice; articulate a strategic approach to LIS research; and promote the development of research capacity in LIS. The Coalition will provide a formal structure to improve access to LIS research, and maximise its relevance and impact. The Coalition is governed by a Board of Directors comprising a representative of each member organisation.

Dr Hall has been seconded to the Coalition for two days a week from her role as Reader in Social Informatics in the School of Computing at Edinburgh Napier University. A well-known researcher, active within both the LIS practitioner and academic communities in the UK and beyond, Dr Hall started her career in academic libraries in the 1980s at the University of Birmingham and Birmingham Polytechnic. Since 1989 she has held research and teaching roles at Queen Margaret and Edinburgh Napier Universities.

As well as holding academic qualifications in LIS, Dr Hall is a Fellow of CILIP. She currently serves on the editorial boards of two major LIS journals (Library and Information Science Research and the Journal of Information Science). She is also on the Executive Committee of the Online Information conference, the largest annual information industry conference and exhibition. She is an Associate Consultant at TFPL, a London-based specialist professional services company focusing on knowledge, information, library, records and web and content management.

Dr Michael Jubb, Chair of the Board of Directors of the LIS Research Coalition, said “We’re pleased that with this new appointment the Coalition’s Board of Directors will now be able to implement its plans to raise the profile and impact of LIS research in the UK.”

Dr Hazel Hall said “Since I first learnt of the proposals for a coalition I have shared the ambition of the LIS research community to come together to address issues that are of strategic importance to the subject domain. These impact the wider population as research outcomes are properly channelled to contribute to policy development and improvements in actual practice in library and information work. My appointment represents a strong commitment by the Coalition member bodies to LIS research in the UK.”

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