Meet the Editors at EBLIP6 – session preview

The Sixth Evidence Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP6) Conference takes place from June 27th until June 30th at the University of Salford. In a blog posting of March 30th 2011 we reported that the LIS Research Coalition is sponsoring part of the programme with a panel session entitled “Meet the editors” on Thursday 30th June. We are now pleased to introduce the panel members at the session and preview the discussion.

Denise KoufogiannakisDenise Koufogiannakis, Editor-in-Chief, Evidence Based Library and Information Practice

“I am the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, which is a relatively new open access journal. We publish quarterly, and have an extensive network of LIS volunteers from around the world who contribute to the journal’s success.

“I am looking forward to Chairing the Meet the Editors session at EBLIP6, and will attempt to ensure that no one editor takes over the conversation! All journals have different approaches, and so I am also looking forward to hearing about how the other LIS journals operate. I think we all have the same overarching goal of publishing articles that are useful to LIS professionals in order to improve practice and advance knowledge. I am looking forward to answering any questions about EBLIP, how we work through the process from submission to publication, how we operate without a budget, and the roles that each of our team members’ play. I would also like to help demystify the process of publishing, which may come across as scary for new authors.”

Miggie PicktonMiggie Pickton, Joint Editor, Library and Information Research

Library and Information Research covers a broad field and attracts submissions from all sectors and parts of the globe.  We are particularly keen to publish research that is accessible to, and usable by, the LIS community and to encourage new authors to write for publication.

“As a practitioner myself, I know that the day job is often so busy that the thought of “doing research” is just one extra chore.  As an editor, I know equally that where librarians have conducted research projects, they have derived enormous benefits at both personal and professional level.  Many of us conduct research on an everyday basis without seemingly recognising the fact: we do original and innovative things in our working lives but we don’t tell anybody about it.  I’d like to set the record straight!

Library and Information Research welcomes submissions from both practitioners and academics.  If you don’t have a paper in the pipeline just now, you may like to get involved as part of our team of peer reviewers. Alternatively, over the next few months we are hoping to appoint a new editorial team. Watch out for notices about this and please do consider applying.”

Dr Christine UrquhartChristine Urquhart, Editorial Board member, Journal of Documentation

“The editorial criteria for the Journal of Documentation are: “The Journal of Documentation has the unique perspective of focusing on theories, concepts, models, frameworks, and philosophies in the information sciences. The journal also publishes research reports, where these have wide significance, and articles on the methodology of research, information history, the information disciplines – including educational issues, curricula and links with other disciplines – and relations between academic study and professional practical. Critical and scholarly reviews are welcome, as are reviews of the evidence base for professional practice.”

“I am interested in how useful theories, concepts, models, frameworks and philosophies are to practitioner thinking about evidence-based practice. Which philosophical perspective – or view on the truth (if any) – is helpful and illuminating? In what respects is communication with people from different disciplinary backgrounds difficult?

“If delegates have a chance to scan some titles and abstracts of recent issues of the Journal of Documentation before the session, it would be interesting to know how the journal’s content provokes thought, provides different viewpoints, or may even seem totally out of touch with professional practice. These ideas would be helpful. We do, after all, require some evidence to justify our opinions!”

Dick HartleyDick Hartley, Editor, Education for Information

“We live in an increasingly demanding world of work, and a world where there is steady progress towards open access academic publishing. As an editor I would be interested to hear what potential authors think editors and publishers do well, what we do not do well, and what the community would like us to do.

“Presumably because of the pressures I referred to, and not least the demands of research assessment, I am finding it increasingly difficult to get referees who can turn around submissions rapidly. So I would be very interested in hearing from some volunteer referees!”

Val Skelton  Val Skelton, Editor, Europe e-news, Information Today; Joint Editor Business Information Review

Business Information Review (BIR) is a quarterly journal focused on information provision and management within organisations.

“Whilst many business information professionals and librarians are still involved with published information – its supply to the desktop, skills for users, research and analysis services – the range of professional activities has expanded. BIR seeks to provide insights across the full range of organizational information activities whilst retaining a keen interest in business information resources.

BIR content is written by information professionals, content, technology and service suppliers, academics and researchers, and leading thinkers from within and outside the information world. Its international readership and authorship covers the corporate sector, consultancies and law firms, publishers and information providers, government and other public institutions, academia, and the third sector.

“I look forward to a lively conversation about why people should consider writing for “formal” publication when there are so many alternative outlets, and (hopefully) to encouraging more people to write so that they can share experience and opinions. I will share some tips on how to become an editor’s favourite contributor!”

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