DREaM 5 speaker insight: Hazel Hall

Professor Hazel Hall

In the sixth of our series of DREaM Conference preview posts, Hazel Hall describes how she feels the DREaM project has gone so far and what delegates can expect from the conference next week.
 

Hazel Hall is the principal investigator of the DREaM project. She is also Director of the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University.
 
 
 

This is the last of the five DREaM events. How have the events gone so far?

 

One of my jobs has been to analyse the evaluation sheets after each event. On the basis of the delegate feedback, the events have gone very well. This is both in terms of meeting the main general aim of the DREaM project to develop a UK network of LIS researchers, and other expectations of the project, such as introducing LIS researchers to a broad range of research techniques and methods. The feedback from the three workshops is particularly interesting in that it has come across as more positive from one event to the next. I think this is as much result of the gelling of the cadre members as of our responses to specific “practical” requests noted in feedback on previous events, such as providing tables for those tweeting at the workshops.

 

What can delegates expect at this event: what will they recognise from previous events, what’s new?

 

They should expect an exciting day. As has been the case with previous events we’ll be doing everything we can to ensure that there is a strong “social” element to the day and that the proceedings will be accessible to remote followers as well as those at the British Library Conference Centre. I’ll be introducing the conference, we have two keynotes, and a One Minute Madness session just like we did for the launch conference in 2011. New this time will be an invited paper on the DREaM network itself, and we’re running a panel session in the afternoon. We also have the opportunity to recognise practitioner excellence in the award to the North West Clinical Librarian Systematic Review and Evaluation Group. I’m really looking forward to hearing Ben Goldacre’s closing keynote presentation, and the chance to relax a little at the end of the day at the networking drinks reception and prize draw.

 

What are your hopes for the future of the UK network of LIS researchers after the DREaM project ends?

 

I hope that the connections that have been made over the past year or so endure and that the links between research and practice in LIS are strengthened. In the future I would love to hear people look back to this project and identify it as a catalyst that helped reinvigorate LIS research in the UK. We’ve now reached the stage where the DREaM project team hands its work over to the community to create a lasting legacy. Here’s hoping that we have have done enough for this to happen.

 
Hazel Hall will be chairing the morning sessions at the DREaM Conference at the British Library on Monday 9th July. For full details about the conference programme, please see the conference web page.

Meet the bursary-winning new professional and PhD student delegates at the DREaM conference

We are very pleased to announce the names of the 10 winners of the travel bursaries offered to new LIS professionals and full-time PhD students to attend the DREaM conference at the British Library on 9th July.

Jean Parris of UWE

  • Graeme Brown – PhD student, University of Strathclyde, PhD title: “Place-making in digital space: public libraries and social capital”.
  • Aislinn Conway – Clinical Evidence Based Information Service (CEBIS) Specialist, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust.
  • Cate Eastwood – PhD student, Loughborough University, PhD title: “Research article abstracts in the social sciences: a genre-based analysis”.
  • Anthony McKeown – PhD student at the University of Ulster in Northern Ireland, PhD title: “Information and communication poverty in Northern Ireland”.
  • Kristin Meredith-Galley – PhD Research Student at Loughborough University, Loughborough, PhD title: “Do primary school libraries contribute to students’ information literacy skills?
  • Jean Parris – Campus Librarian, University of the West of England.
  • Tom Rogers – Information Librarian, University of Bath Library.
  • Rachel Steele – Clinical/Site Librarian, Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust.
  • Ella Taylor-Smith – PhD student, Napier University in Edinburgh, PhD title: “Participation space studies. How do interpretations of online and offline spaces influence (e)participation in community and civic life?”.
  • Lillian Tsang Phillips – PhD student, Northumbria University. PhD title: “Evolution of librarianship: the changing role of academic information professionals in the 21st century”.

Five of the people listed above – Aislinn, Anthony, Jean, Rachel and Ella – are all members of the DREaM project cadre, and attended all three DREaM workshops between October 2011 and April 2012.

Some of our bursary winners have shared the reasons why they are looking forward to the DREaM conference:

Rachel Steele says that the DREaM project has been extremely beneficial to her, both in the breadth and depth of presentations about some research methodologies that she had not previously heard of, and also in developing external relationships with other DREaM participants. These participants have stimulated her own work by exposing her to new ideas from their working contexts which will – in time – enable her to continually improve her job performance. She feels sure that attendance at the conference will deepen her understanding of research methodologies and allow for further interactions with conference participants which will be invaluable to her.

Lillian Tsang Phillips says that this is her first conference since she starting her PhD so she is really looking forward to meeting colleagues, exchanging ideas and gaining insights from experienced colleagues and guest speakers.

Lillian Tsang Phillips, Tom Rogers and Rachel Steele

Anthony McKweon says that having enjoyed participating at previous DREaM events, which provided the opportunity to network with other PhD students, learn from experienced practitioners, and discuss research and exchange ideas, he is excited about returning to the British Library on July 9th. This event will contributes to his personal and professional development by providing the chance to tell other researchers from the library and information community about what is he doing, get new ideas and see things from other contexts. He believes that learning about how other parts of the UK deliver library and information services is always worthwhile. He adds that he is particularly interested in Professor Carol Tenopir’s presentation on methods for measuring value and impact in libraries. He also has high expectations for the one-minute madness presentations, which he thinks should be very good!

Aislinn Conway says that she is looking forward to returning to the British Library Conference Centre, which has been the venue for two other DREaM events. She is impressed with the range of speakers on the programme, and welcomes the one-minute madness session as a platform for delegate presentations. She believes that the conference will bring together the people who have participated in the DREaM project to date, and looks forward to exploring its very worthy achievements.

Ella Taylor-Smith, Anthony McKeown, Kristin Meredith Galley, and Aislinn Conway

Kristin Meredith-Galley say that PhD work can be an isolating experience, particularly in the first year and that she is looking forward to getting out from behind the desk to join a community of practice at the conference, to exchange ideas, resources and to learn more about best practice in research. To her this is a great opportunity, not only to share her own research in this community, but also to share in the success and excitement of other delegates’ research.

Tom Rogers says that after working for a number of years on a variety of research projects in several different locations he decided that he wanted a career change. He moved into library work in January 2010. He spent about 18 months working as a Library Assistant at the University of Bath, completed a PgDip in Information and Library Management, and then looked for his first professional job. This came to fruition in January 2012, when he started in his current role and began working towards CILIP chartership. Professional library work involves him in variety and change and gives him plenty of opportunity to do the kinds of work that he finds rewarding. When asked why is he looking forward to the conference Tom said that he wants to learn more about the development of a network of practitioner researchers, and he is interested how this may help his professional development. He also wants to discover the main research themes and questions that conference delegates and speakers see as important and reflect upon how they compare to his own list of interests. He is hoping to learn about academic and practitioner research in areas such as: operations, marketing and strategy management in libraries; digital media and technology supported learning; learning and teaching of information and library skills; design of library spaces—technological and organisational, physical and virtual.

Graeme Brown

When we asked Graeme Brown why he was interested in the DREaM conference he said that he was attracted by the programme in general. However, what he is in particularly looking forward to are two presentations. He is interested in Professor Carol Tenopir’s opening keynote because there is a degree of overlap of her themes with parts of his own work. He is also looking forward to hearing Dr Ben Goldacre speak as he enjoys Ben’s discussions of evidence bases and methodologies in the Bad Science blog and liked Ben’s Bad Science book. Graeme says that he is grateful for the chance to attend the concluding DREAM event, learn more about what the project has entailed, and meet and learn from other researchers in the LIS area and beyond.

DREaM 5 speaker insight: Charles Oppenheim

Charles Oppenheim

Professor Charles Oppenheim

In the fifth of our DREaM Conference preview posts, Charles Oppenheim sums up the DREaM project so far from his perspective and describes the legacy he hopes the project will leave for the LIS community.
 

Professor Charles Oppenheim is a co-investigator of the DREaM project. He is also a member of the Legal Advisory Board of the European Commission, and of the Libraries and Archives Copyright Alliance.
 
 
 

This is the last of the five DREaM events. How have the events gone so far?

 

I have attended three of the four previous events. Based upon my experience of those three, plus reports of the one I missed, the series has been extremely successful in bringing together a cadre of LIS researchers of varying ages, experience and backgrounds, and introducing them to novel research techniques that they may not have considered before.

 

What can delegates expect at this event: what will they recognise from previous events, what’s new?

 

This will be more of a rounding up event – it will inform delegates about the key results of the DREaM project so far, and will provide them with an exciting vision of the importance of research to LIS in influencing policy and practice. I very much hope that Ben Goldacre will provide an inspirational send off.

 

What are your hopes for the future of the UK network of LIS researchers after the DREaM project ends?

 

I hope that this is just the beginning and that, in conjunction with the Library and Information Research Group (LIRG), a new generation of enthusiastic and competent LIS researchers will emerge and be self-sustaining through what will be, in effect, a community of practice.

 
Charles Oppenheim will be chairing the afternoon sessions at the DREaM Conference at the British Library on Monday 9th July. For full details about the conference programme and to book a place, please see the conference web page.

DREaM 5 speaker insight: Jo Alcock

Jo Alcock

In the fourth of our DREaM Conference preview posts, Jo Alcock describes her experiences as a member of the DREaM workshop cadre and explains what she hopes to bring to the panel discussion …and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers.
 

Jo Alcock is researcher at Evidence Base, Birmingham City University. She is currently working towards CILIP Chartership and is Chair of CILIP West Midlands Branch.
 
 
 

How have you been involved in the DREaM project to date?

I attended the DREaM opening conference last July and as a relatively new LIS researcher was keen to be involved in the project. I was fortunate enough to be able to be part of the ‘cadre’ of researchers and practitioners attending the series of workshops in Edinburgh and London. I’ve learnt a lot from these and am looking forward to putting some of what I’ve learnt into practice in my research. In addition I have had the opportunity to present on my research during the participant-led sections of the workshops, as can be seen in the video of the “unconference” half hour session at the October 2011 workshop. I have also formed new connections and strengthened existing connections with others interested in LIS research.

Why are you participating in the conference?

I was invited to attend the conference and participate as part of the afternoon panel session as a representative of the DREaM workshop cadre. I hope I’ll be able to contribute both my own opinions and that of my fellow cadre members regarding the future of LIS research.

The title of the afternoon panel session at the conference is “…and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers”. Why is it important that the UK network of LIS researchers is sustained, and what do you anticipate we will be discussed in the panel session?

Many of the reasons the LIS Research Coalition was established are still true, particularly the gap between LIS researchers and LIS practitioners, and the lack of cohesion within LIS research. Though the work of the LIS Research Coalition has made great steps towards improving this, there is still work to be done. As a current researcher and previous practitioner, I’d like to think that as a profession we can continue to take forward the good work started by the LIS Research Coalition and strengthen the connections and collaboration within LIS research itself, and between research and practice. I hope the afternoon panel will be able to conclude with some actions for us all to take forward to help build and sustain a network of LIS researchers.

Jo Alcock will be participating in a panel discussion entitled: …and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers at the DREaM Conference at the British Library on Monday 9th July. For full details about the conference programme and to book a place, please see the conference web page.

DREaM 5 speaker insight: Dr Carol Tenopir

Dr Carol Tenopir

In the third of our DREaM Conference preview posts, Dr Carol Tenopir describes her opening keynote presentation Building evidence of the value and impact of library and information services: methods, metrics and ROI.
 

Carol Tenopir is a Chancellor’s Professor at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and the Director of Research for the College of Communication and Information, and Director of the Center for Information and Communication Studies.
 
 
 

What is your interest in the DREaM project?

As an LIS researcher myself, I applaud the goals of the DREaM project to build a network for researchers in the UK. We can all learn from each other — in both methods and findings — plus finding collaborators is increasingly important. Hazel Hall has been keeping me updated on the DREaM project throughout its duration when we have been together as co-presenters at various other conferences.

Why are you participating in the conference?

I was honoured to be asked by Hazel to participate in this final event. Although I am based in the US, my research is often international in scope and I value my interactions with my UK colleagues. Many of the topics we research are not restricted by place, as the LIS issues and methods used to study them are global.

What do you hope to achieve in your keynote?

I will be presenting some of the findings from my ongoing studies of measuring value and outcomes from scholarly reading and, more specifically, return on investment in libraries. I will be discussing (1) methods for measuring value, and (2) findings from studies on the measurement of the value of libraries conducted in the UK, US and elsewhere. Applied research in LIS has value beyond just the interesting things that researchers discover – although that is a continuing motivation for all researchers. Importantly, research evidence can help practitioners make informed decisions about their services delivery.

You are also participating in the afternoon panel session. What do you expect to come up in the discussion?

The panel “…and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers” is all about motivation and means for keeping collaboration strong. DREaM is a starting point; for it to be truly successful in the long run, all involved – including researchers, practitioner-researchers, and practitioners who use the research output of the LIS research community in their work – must make an effort to keep the networking going. Networking means sharing ideas. It also means finding ways to actively work together in collaborative research on important LIS topics.

Dr Carol Tenopir will be presenting the opening keynote: “Building evidence of the value and impact of library and information services: methods, metrics and ROI” at the DREaM Conference at the British Library on Monday 9th July. She will also be participating in a panel discussion titled: “…and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers”. For full details about the conference programme and to book a place, please see the conference web page.

DREaM 5 speaker insight: Carla Basili

Carla Basili

In the second of our DREaM Conference preview posts, Dr Carla Basili describes the perspectives that she will bring to the panel discussion …and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers.
 
Dr Carla Basili is Senior Researcher at the Italian National Research Council and Associate Professor on Methodologies of Scientific Information at Sapienza University in Rome.
 
Note: In the event Carla Basili was unable to attend the DREaM conference on 9th July 2012. John Dolan kindly took her place on the panel.

How have you been involved in the DREaM project to date?

Participation in the panel session at the DREaM conference on 9th July will be my first face-to-face involvement in the project.

Why are you participating at the conference?

I’m pleased to be participating at the conference because the themes of the DREaM project are close to my research interests. In 2003 I launched a network of researchers in Information Literacy (EnIL, the European network on Information Literacy). On 9th July I can report about my experience of this network, and a framework of variables for the qualitative analysis and comparison of European information literacy policies. I’ll be happy to discuss these themes with delegates one-to-one during the breaks and networking sessions, as well as formally during the panel session.

The title of the afternoon panel session at the conference is “…and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers”. Why is it important that the UK network of LIS researchers is sustained, and what do you anticipate we will be discussed in the panel session?

Firstly, the DREaM project is a timely attempt to answer to the question: how to justify the funding of research in the LIS domain? This question, indeed, is part of a more general concern as to how research funding in the Humanities can be justified in terms of impact.

Both these connected questions are of great relevance, particularly in the European context. What’s interesting and new about the work of the DREaM project is that while a number of initiatives have been already undertaken for the Arts and Humanities sector in general, the focus here is on one disciplinary area in particular: library and information science.

Secondly, and with specific reference to the theme of the panel discussion, I’m looking forward to discussing concrete steps that will:

  • formalise and manage the DREaM network and
  • raise the familiarity among LIS researchers with innovative research methods and interdisciplinary research

…together with the potential benefits of collaborating in a network.

Dr Carla Basili will be participating in a panel discussion entitled: …and so the DREaM goes on: means of sustaining the UK network of LIS researchers at the DREaM Conference at the British Library on Monday 9th July. For full details about the conference programme and to book a place, please see the conference web page.

DREaM 5 speaker insight: Dr Louise Cooke

Louise Cooke

Dr Louise Cooke

As the DREaM Conference at the British Library on 9th July fast approaches, we bring you the first in our series of preview posts from our speakers and panelists. In this post, Dr Louise Cooke describes her involvement with the DREaM project as a whole and introduces her invited paper: Facets of DREaM: An analysis of network development to support UK LIS research and researchers.

Dr Louise Cooke is a Senior Lecturer at Loughborough University, where she teaches on the MSc Information and Knowledge Management programme.

Dr Cooke gave an introduction to social network analysis at the second DREaM event.
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